August 20th, 2017
Yoga And Running Marathon Training Schedule

Running and Yoga: A Full Marathon Training Schedule

The confirmation email is in your inbox. You have signed up for your first half or full marathon. You will dedicate the next 12-20 weeks to preparing yourself physically and mentally for race day, one mile at a time.

Running 3-4 times a week will build the stamina, strength and endurance you’ll need to complete the 13.1 or 26.2 mile race. But running alone isn’t enough. There will be days each week in which you are focusing on cross training and recovery. These days should include core, balance work, strength training, breath control and mental focus. All of which are a big part of the yoga practice.

Why runners should practice yoga

Stephanie Ring Yoga and Running
Yoga is one of best methods of cross training and recovery for runners. There are so many different styles of yoga and ways to practice, that you can tailor it to your needs during the different phases of your training plan.

When your are building up the miles, a power yoga practice will improve lung capacity, strengthen your core and legs as well as stretch places like your hamstrings, glutes and hip flexors. As you begin to move into weeks with more volume, you can reduce the intensity of your yoga practice and go for something more restorative.

The yoga and running full marathon training plan

I’ve put together a 20-week training plan for beginners that will take you from zero to half marathon and then to a full marathon. Within each week there are 3-4 days of running and 2-3 days of yoga and at least 1 rest day.

Tips to remaining strong during training

  1. Get adequate sleep and eat well. This means: eat real food, eat a ton of vegetables, and don’t overeat.
  2. Respect your body and listen when something doesn’t feel right.
  3. Follow the schedule. Don’t double up on workouts unless specified.

Descriptions of yoga classes

  • Power Yoga/Heated Vinyasa Flow: This class should be rigorous, faced paced and strong.
  • Hatha Yoga: This class will be slower than the power yoga practice but will still focus on alignment and breathing.
  • Restorative/Yin: This type of class is very slow and you may end up holding postures for up to 5 minutes.

Running Tips

Time Trials: These runs are meant for you to get a feel for how you will run on race day. Make note of your time. Run at a smooth and even pace.

Speed Work: There are many ways to incorporate speed work into your training. Below is a list of 5 different workouts that focus on speed. Feel free to modify these or search the web for more. Make sure to warm up for 10 minutes and cool down for 10 minutes.

Sprints
10 Rounds every 2 Minutes- 100 meter sprint

Hill Sprints
Find a hill. Run up the hill and then walk down up to 10 times.

Fartlek
Every 5 minutes run fast for 1:00 then return to normal pace.

Track Workouts
8×400- Sprint straightaways and walk curves
*2 minute rest after round 4, then continue

Intervals
30 seconds sprint/30 seconds recover
1 minute sprint/1 minute recover
2 minutes sprint/2 minutes recover
1 minute sprint/1 minute recover
30 seconds sprint/30 seconds recover
5-minute recovery run
Repeat once

The half marathon and full marathon training schedule

Week Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
1- Build Rest Day 3 Miles Power Yoga 3 Miles + Speed Work Rest or Restorative/Yin Power Yoga 4 Miles
2- Build Rest Day 3 Miles + Speed Work Power Yoga 3 Miles Rest or Restorative/Yin Power Yoga 4 Miles
3- Build Rest Day 3.5 Miles Power Yoga 3.5 Miles + Speed Work Rest or Restorative/Yin Power Yoga 5 Miles
4- Build Rest Day 3.5 Miles + Speed Work Power Yoga 3.5 Miles Rest or Restorative/Yin Power Yoga 5 Miles
5- Build Rest Day 4 Miles Power Yoga 4 Miles + Speed Work Rest or Restorative/Yin Power Yoga 6 Miles
6- Build Rest Day 4 Miles + Speed Work Power Yoga 4 Miles Rest or Easy 3 Miles Rest 3.1 Mile Time Trial
7- Build Rest Day 4.5 Miles Power Yoga 4.5 Miles + Speed Work Rest or Restorative/Yin Power Yoga 8 Miles
8- Build Rest Day 4.5 Miles + Speed Work Power Yoga 4.5 Miles Rest or Restorative/Yin Power Yoga 9 Miles
9- Build Rest Day 5 Miles Hatha Yoga 5 Miles + Speed Work Rest or Easy 3 Miles Rest 6.2 Mile Time Trial
10- Build Rest Day 5 Miles + Speed Work Hatha Yoga 5 Miles Rest or Restorative/Yin Hatha Yoga 10 Miles
11- Build Rest Day 5 Miles Hatha Yoga 5 Miles + Speed Work Rest or Restorative/Yin Hatha Yoga 11 Miles
12- Race Week Rest Day 4 Miles Hatha Yoga 2 Miles easy Rest Rest Half Marathon
13- Recovery Week Rest Day Hatha Yoga 4 Miles Power Yoga 5 Miles Rest 9 Miles
14- Build Rest Day 8 Miles 4 Miles + Power Yoga 5 Miles + Speed Work Rest or Restorative/Yin Power Yoga 15 Miles
15- Build Rest Day 8 Miles 4 Miles + Power Yoga 5 Miles + Speed Work Rest or Restorative/Yin Power Yoga 17 Miles
16- Recovery Week Rest Day 5 Miles Hatha Yoga 5 Miles Rest or Restorative/Yin Power Yoga 12 Miles
17- Build Rest Day 8 Miles 6 Miles + Power Yoga 5 Miles + Speed Work Rest or Restorative/Yin Power Yoga 19 Miles
18- Build Rest Day 8 Miles 6 Miles + Power Yoga 5 Miles + Speed Work Rest or Restorative/Yin Hatha Yoga 21 Miles
19- Taper Rest Day 5 Miles 3 Miles + Power Yoga 5 Miles Rest or Restorative/Yin Hatha Yoga 12 Miles
20- Race Week Rest Day 3 Miles 4 Miles Hatha Yoga Rest 2 Miles Marathon

Stephanie Ring

Creator of Endure Yoga (www.endureyoga.com), Stephanie is an athlete who loves yoga and understands the benefits of it as part of athletic training. Movement has always been an important part of her life, starting with ballet at age 3 and moving to competitive cheerleading at age 16. She started practicing yoga in college but it was years later when she started training for triathlons that  her yoga practice was taken to the next level. Stephanie utilized yoga as cross-training and as a way to increase her overall performance, prevent injuries and improve recovery time. She completed more than a dozen races including two marathons, a century ride and two Half Ironmans.   Eventually, her love of endurance sports began to wane. It was then that her interest in gymnastics and CrossFit started to grow. When she was introduced to CrossFit in 2013, it wasn’t long before her training days out numbered the days on the yoga mat. It was around this time when she created WOD Recovery Yoga. A yoga practice designed to help athletes recover mentally and physically from training. Shortly after that, she wrote the WOD Recover Yoga E-Book as a resource for athletes looking to incorporate yoga into their daily training.   Beyond coaching, she is a student at heart. She loves learning new forms of movement to improve her performance and the performance of her athletes. She challenges herself daily to move past physical and mental barriers.   She is a CrossFit Level 2 Coach coaching at Crossfit Marin and certified 500 Hour Yoga Teacher teaching at Yoga Flow SF.

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